Category: confederates

Posts

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19 June 2020 / confederates

A 30-foot obelisk Confederate monument, which had stood for 112 years, was taken down in the downtown Decatur square in response to a judge's order.

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19 June 2020 / confederates

A statue of Albert Pike, the only outdoor monument to a Confederate officer in Washington, D.C., was toppled by protesters on Juneteenth of 2020.1

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18 June 2020 / confederates
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18 June 2020 / confederates

Three days after the statue was splashed with discoloring chemicals1, the “Memorial to Company A, Capitol Guards” was placed on May 15, 1911 by “Friends And Relatives Of The Capital Guards And By The Citizens Of Little Rock Under The Auspices Of The Robert C. Newton Camp, United Sons of Confederate Veterans”2.

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13 June 2020 / confederates / slavers
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12 June 2020 / confederates
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10 June 2020 / confederates / slavers
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09 June 2020 / confederates
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08 June 2020 / confederates
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07 June 2020 / confederates
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31 May 2020 / confederates

Protesters pulled down a statue of Charles Linn, a captain in the Confederate Navy, and forced the city to remove the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument of which it was a part.

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20 August 2018 / confederates
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07 October 2017 / confederates

A Confederate memorial built by the United Daughters of the Confederacy was removed from a park on George's Island, MA after being boxed up for months.

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19 August 2017 / confederates / slavers

A statue Confederate General Robert E. Lee was removed from Duke University's Chapel after being damaged in the week following Unite the Right.

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15 August 2017 / confederates

A Durham, NC Confederate memorial built by the United Daughters of the Confederacy was toppled by demonstrators days after the Unite the Right rally ended when a neo-Nazi committed a fatal act of terrorism in nearby Charlottesville, VA.

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19 May 2017 / confederates / slavers
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28 September 2015 / confederates

A Maryland park that had been named for Robert E. Lee in 1945 was renamed by the city of Baltimore after the June 2015 Charleston church massacre.